Rocky Mountain Beeplant

By Skip Via
skip@westvalleynaturalists.org

Rocky Mountain beeplant is native to the valley, although I seem to rarely encounter one. They are annuals, but they can grow up to 5 feet in a season. They are in the cleome family (Cleome serrulata) and are often cultivated in gardens. They are one of the most visually striking wildflowers in the area, as you will see.

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Crab Goldenrod Spiders

by Pat Jaquith
pat@westvalleynaturalists.org

People who look closely at flowers may also see a variety of insects. Pollinators’ visits are self-serving: they are attracted to the flowers for the nectar or pollen they can collect for food. Only incidentally do they provide the service of pollination. Crab Goldenrod Spiders (named for the flower where they are frequently observed) visit flowers to seek nourishment by preying on the pollinators.

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